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Tag Archives: slider-front-page

Sonoma County Court again halts logging in second “Dogwood” timber harvest plan lawsuit: Gualala River floodplain redwood forest left intact for now

Wild and Scenic reach of the lower Gualala River on the bank opposite Dogwood THP area, 2016

Media Release June 7, 2018 Sonoma County Superior Court has once again granted a preliminary injunction to put the start of logging on hold in the 100-year-old redwood forest of the Gualala River floodplain, located in northwest Sonoma County and southwest Mendocino County. On June 5, 2018, Judge René Chouteau issued a tentative order granting a motion for preliminary injunction …

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California Buckeye (Aesculus californica)

1. Buckeye Tree in Bloom Along the Wheatfield Fork

Family SAPINDACEAE Life Cycle In the merry month of May the California Buckeye puts on its most magnificent display with candle-like white spires of flowers that fill the air with fragrance and make the trees impossible to miss even when they are tucked away in creek drainages and canyons and the edge of chaparral—their preferred habitats. [Photo: 1].   Like …

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Gualala logging dispute heats up after state’s green light

Redwood forest targeted for logging in Gualala River floodplain; Dogwood2

by Mary Callahan, The Press Democrat, April 19, 2018 [excerpt:] A controversial plan to log miles of Gualala River floodplain, including nearly century-old redwood trees just outside Gualala Point Regional Park, is back on track, setting the stage for a showdown in court or perhaps among the trees themselves. Charll Stoneman, forest manager for Gualala Redwood Timber, which owns the …

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STOP “Dogwood” floodplain logging plan! Revised version as bad as original

"Rally for the River" - July 16, 2016; photo credit: Anne Mary Schaefer

Friends of Gualala River (FoGR), along with Forest Unlimited, is taking legal action against the resubmitted Timber Harvest Plan “Dogwood,” the THP that would log in the floodplain of the Gualala River. CAL FIRE approved this THP on March 30, 2018. Dogwood contains the largest tracts of mature redwoods in floodplains, beginning at the boundary of Gualala Point Regional Park’s …

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Red Alder (Alnus rubra)

1. Mature Red Alders in Full Foliage

Red Alder, Pacific Coast Alder, Oregon Alder, Western Alder (Alnus rubra) Family BETULACEAE The red alder is one of two species of alder common to the Gualala River watershed’s riparian corridors. [Photo: 1] It occurs in the western portion where it grows along the lower reaches of the river and its tributaries. Further east in the higher elevations, red alder …

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White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

1a. White Alders Growing Along Buckeye Creek in the Soda Springs Reserve

Like the closely related red alder, white alder is a species that grows along the riparian corridor and shares many of its adaptations to streamside conditions. [Photo: 1a, 1b]     In general it occurs more inland from the coast and in more upland areas than the red alder whose occurrence tapers off farther east in the watershed. According to …

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California Bay Laurel (Umbellularia californica)

1. Magnificent Bay Tree on Tin Barn Road

California Bay Laurel, Bay, Pepperwood, Oregon Myrtle, California Olive, Spice Tree, Headache Tree (Umbellularia californica) Family LAURACEAE February is an excellent time to see flowering California Bay Laurel, though it can bloom as early as November and well on into spring. One of the more commonly occurring trees throughout the Gualala River watershed [Photo 1.], this evergreen hardwood species has …

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Coast Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens)

1. Coast Redwood Reaching for the Light

genus  Sequoia, family Cupressaceae (cypress) An Unparalleled Species The most iconic tree species in our region is the Coast Redwood. [Photo 1.] Its presence in the Gualala River watershed is deeply historic, it is a species central to the ecology and economy here, and it is perhaps the most remarkable tree species on earth. Redwoods are the tallest beings on …

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We Speak for the River

The Gualala River lagoon, by Mike Nelson

How a Northern California community halted a plan to log old coast redwood trees in the Gualala River floodplain by Jeanne Jackson Published in Wild Hope magazine Fall, 2017 re-printed with permission The Gualala River empties into the Pacific Ocean at the border between Sonoma and Mendocino counties on the northern California coast. It is a wild river with no …

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“Dogwood” timber harvest plan lawsuit ends with logging permit vacated by CAL FIRE; most of 400 acres of Gualala River floodplain redwood forest left intact

90-100 year old redwood tree marked for cutting in Gualala River floodplain; photo credit: copyright © 2016 Mike Shoys, used with permission

Friends of Gualala River Forest Unlimited California Native Plant Society MEDIA RELEASE Date: September 26, 2017 The lawsuit to stop logging the Gualala River floodplain redwood forest tract in the “Dogwood” timber harvest plan (THP) is over. CAL FIRE was ordered by Sonoma County Superior Court to vacate (revoke) the Gualala Redwood Timber Company timber harvest plan on April 18, …

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Photos of “Rally for the River” – July 16, 2016

"Rally for the River" - July 16, 2016; photo credit: Anne Mary Schaefer

We counted 180 – 200 participants, with dozens of spontaneously prepared hand-made signs and artwork. Speakers included Jeanne Jackson, Eric Wilder, Charlie Ivor, Larry Hanson, Peter Baye and Noreen Evans.                     See also, video: Jeanne Jackson speaks at the Rally for the River

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Maps of Logging Plans on the Lower Gualala River

Interactive map of Gualala River logging plans 2015

Updated August 12, 2015 Friends of Gualala River hired a geographic information system (GIS) specialist to take the multiple timber harvest plan (THP) maps submitted and make new composite maps that are readable in context of the landscape and past logging. The full extent of the footprint of the logging plans in the lower Gualala River floodplain redwood forest and …

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