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A Plan to Log Century-Old Redwoods Could Set a Bad Precedent

Environmentalists argue a California agency approved a 330-acre logging project that could damage sensitive floodplain habitat.

July 15, 2016, by Taylor Hill,
copyright © 2016 TakePart

[excerpt:]

This time, it’s not iconic old-growth redwood groves facing the ax along California’s northern coast, but the trees that are slated for logging are nearly as environmentally important, conservationists contend.

Last week, Cal Fire – the state’s forestry and fire protection agency – approved a controversial timber harvest plan that allows a company to log 100-year-old second-growth redwood trees along a 330-acre stretch of the Gualala River on the Sonoma County coast.

Environmentalists say logging the region’s mixed second-growth redwood and Douglas fir trees – especially stands located so close to the banks of the river – could have cascading effects on the health of the ecosystem and could set a precedent for granting future logging efforts in sensitive habitats statewide.

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90-100 year old redwood tree marked for cutting in Gualala River floodplain; Dogwood4
90-100 year old redwood tree marked for cutting in Gualala River floodplain